Wednesday, January 7, 2009

All that Glitters...

All that glitters is not Gold. Sometimes, it has fur and a soft, velvety nose.

Some people can visualize, some can't... I can see it. That "diamond in the rough." The disheveled, dirty, in the middle of a growth spurt horse. This is Winter time and in Seattle, our horses are rain soaked, long furred, Yeti look a likes. But I can see what they'll look like this Spring, don't you worry about a thing!

So it came up in conversation the other day, that a horse I had suggested for a client/friend of mine, was their DREAM HORSE! But she also proceeded to tell me that at first she thought I was kind of crazy. Now, I'm not surprised I get that a lot! J/K! But, truthfully, she didn't understand what I saw in this dirty bay 2 year old with butt a wee bit higher than her shoulder. Well, I saw a nice prospect in her. She had great legs, an excellent hip, a wide chest and barrel and I knew her shoulder would pop up and match her hinny. I could just tell...

She was also personality plus to boot, with great breeding... Now for me personally, breeding only goes so damn far. I want to SEE and touch and observe the horse before I make any judgement calls, but anyway. I guess I could see the potential, but at first my client was very skeptical. And in her exact words, "You know, I really had to trust you about Di!!" Um...thanks, I think. LOL!

But, you know what? I understand where she's coming from. It's a big investment and when your first impression is a messy horse, it's really scary!

NOW, however, her horse is in a clean stall and do you think she looks anything like she did the day I pointed her out? Nope. Her shoulder and butt are level, She learns faster than most horses I've seen. She's shiny and clean with a nice warm winter blanket on. She did a complete 180, which I saw from a million miles away, but only now has she been spit shined and polished for others to see it as well...

Di's owners are with out a doubt, deeply in love with her! She will have a forever home with them and she's only two and half!!! She's got a great life ahead of her and her owner's think she is TOPS!! She is EXACTLY what they were looking for. A Diamond in rough, polished to perfection!!


9 comments:

horsesandponies4ever said...

I agree. Breeding can get you only so far. But that is what people seem to only care about. They ignore genetic flaws, conformation faults, ignore the fact that said horse is completely a homicidal maniac that is a menice to society..... Why, oh why would you breed a horrible temper horse, to create another horrible temper horse? Who cares about bloodlines, if the horse is psyco, don't breed. We have enough psyco, and poorly trained horses as there is. Or better yet, untouched psycos.

kestrel said...

Temperament first!
Strangely enough, even if the head or conformation is "unsightly" in someone's eyes, a kind happy horse is almost always sound. Hmm....
The diamond in the rough is always a horse of personality, and finding the right person and the right job to suit them usually isn't hard.
I am actually breeding my stallion to my own mare to get another baby of my dreams. I already have one in training, and what a joy! Nothing to undo for a change!
I want saddle-horse sound minds, bodies, brains, beauty and balance. I have it in this cross. They also kick ass in the show ring. Again, hmmm.
I don't promote my stallion, and I intend on keeping the baby myself.
I'm too old and brittle to want to take on another genetically screwed up show or racing cull with health and mental problems that has been bred to do a job that does not suit me as a rider.
Sometimes you do find the horse who's fallen on hard times, and what a joy it is to find them the home they deserve, and what a gratifying feeling to see someone in love with a safe and sound family friend!

S&D said...

Again, I thank you TX for your great eye in seeing my Diamond in the rough :)
Let me mention, I purchased her at the Enumclaw auction. She was unbrushed, her hoofs needed a trim, and her tail and mane were in dread locks! What a mess! We truly appreciate your ability to see past that dirty scared baby in the pen :)
And remember, spring is just around the corner... soon she'll be coming your way for training!! We both are VERY excited.

Trainer X said...

Hahahah My pleasure... My Pleasure...

sterling said...

Slightly off topic, but can you guess at what's wrong with this video?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuxXYnfcrSQ&NR=1

Trickery said...

Absolutely agree with horsesandponies. It's amazing when you hear a person tell you their horse is by Whatshisface out of a Princesspony mare, and then tell you that he's been at the trainers for 8 months and they still havent got on him, but he cost them $120 grand. Some horse do need the right person, but most of them seem content with whoever owns tham as long as they are cared for properly. I can't justify some of the prices I see these days on weanlings in the dressage world just because of their bloodline, regardless of it's own personal movement/confo/genetic flaws.
As for diamonds in the rough, they just make your heart skip a beat when they get their first spring coat when they are looking the million bucks you certainly didn't pay for them! Makes it all worth while.

2toads2luv said...

My diamond in the ruff came out of a show barn as a 2 year old. Decent bloodlines, gangly, downhill, but had 30 days of WP training (wow).

Anyhow, bought him for my sister, and I hated the horse. We stayed off him till he was 3, but I still didn't get along with him.

Well, things change. I started riding him, he filled out, leveled out, turned into a brick shit house with a butt to die for.

Most importantly, however, was his great mind. I could go on and on, but basically, he was awesome. Turned out to be a barrel horse I could have gone pro on, but could also put a 2 year old on him and walk away knowing the baby would be safe.

Sometimes there's just that... something.

2toads2luv said...

Oh, and that Paso video... Either the rider is a giant or the horse is a miniture. Either way, the rider looks big enough to carry the little mare.

That's all my unedubacated paso fino eye could find.

Deanna said...

Sterling - I don't know paso fino's, but that mares back (which btw is too close to the ground ;))did not move the entire time! Ok, maybe when she tripped. *Rider was holding her breath?
From the vid notes, they seem to like her and take very good care of her.